Engaged Learning

A student uses technology and digital connections to review public health data at the University of Michigan School of Public Health

7 Ways the Pandemic Changed Global Public Health for the Future

Chinyere Neale

The romanticism of global public health work, says Chinyere Neale, will not survive the pandemic nor the new forms of collaboration it has demanded of researchers. Knowing that we can do really good work from anywhere in the world—including our current location—is a good thing for public health.

An interview between two people in an urban setting

Career Prospects for Public Health Graduates Remain Strong

Krystle Forbes

Demand for public health professionals remains high, as does hiring for students graduating with public degrees. During the pandemic, some areas of public health have seen disruption in the services they provide. But this has also clarified our deep, ongoing need for those services.

Illustration of a policing situation

Systemic Racism, Policing, and Public Health Advocacy

Q&A with Payton Watt and Jamison Koeman

It can take a long time to develop new policy, and some advocacy roads lead to dead ends. But good advocacy work always makes a difference. As racism, policing, and police reform were becoming the national public health story of the summer, student leaders led a remote advocacy initiative to continue bringing public health insights to the discourse.

Microscopic image of a coronavirus

Teaching Infectious Disease History in 2020

Jon Zelner

Teaching a course on the social history of infectious disease during a pandemic poses particular challenges. Jon Zelner decided to put his students’ energies to work on public-facing content aimed at helping people make sense of this pandemic and its implications in context.

online_learners

Online MPH Students Tackle Real COVID-19 Issues in the Virtual Classroom

MPH Students Reflect on COVID-19 Simulation Coursework

As the coronavirus pandemic swept across the nation, University of Michigan School of Public Health online master’s students in Population and Health Sciences had the unique opportunity to use what they’ve learned through coursework in a real-world public health simulation focused on controlling the coronavirus pandemic.