Community Partnership

An overgrown vacant lot

$1.2M grant to support research on vacant lot reuse and community violence prevention

A new study led by University of Michigan School of Public Health researchers will examine the impact of high vacancy in urban areas on the rate of violence. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention provided a three-year grant of $1.2 million to investigate the short- and long-term effects of vacant lot reuse projects on total violent crime incidents and injury.

A vacant lot

Vacant lot greening can reduce community crime, violence

New research from Michigan Public Health

A three-year study was conducted by researchers at the U-M Institute for Firearm Injury Prevention and the Michigan Youth Violence Prevention Center in Youngstown, Ohio, with the support from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These researchers studied the Busy Streets Theory and the greening hypothesis, which involves community engagement in vacant lots to help reduce crime and violence

An image of an apple orchard.

Michigan Farmworker Project seeks to improve social and environmental health for marginalized population

Q&A with Alexis Handal and Lisbeth Iglesias-Rios

Led by University of Michigan School of Public Health social epidemiologists Alexis Handal and Lisbeth Iglesias-Rios, the Michigan Farmworker Project (MFP) is a community-based participatory research initiative aimed at improving the social and environmental health of Michigan’s farmworker population, who play a critical role in the state’s food supply chain. Handal and Iglesias-Rios discuss their work.

Three small children play at a table.

Day care and the flu: Using robots, ferrets to explore ways to stop the spread

New research from Emily Martin

A new study seeks to better understand how behavioral and environmental factors affect the transmission of respiratory viruses in child care settings. Called MITIGATE FLU (Multidisciplinary InvesTIGation to Ease inFLUenza), the research is a collaboration between Virginia Tech, the University of Michigan, Emory University and the University of Pittsburgh.

 A truck drives by a neighborhood in Southwest Detroit. Neighbors say the constant noise makes it hard to sleep or enjoy outdoor activities.

Truck Noise in Southwest Detroit Adds to Public Health Concerns

New research from Stuart Batterman

Researchers at the University of Michigan joined forces with the Southwest Detroit Community Benefits Coalition and local community members to evaluate the noise impact of trucks on Southwest Detroit. Currently, trucks are being rerouted as part of the new Gordie Howe International Bridge construction.